Well Pump Failure: What to Do if Your Well Stops Working | Perry's Pump Repair

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Well Pump Failure: What to Do if Your Well Stops Working

One morning you wake up, go to wash your face in your bathroom, and turn on the faucet but… Nothing happens. If you’re on a private well, this is a sign that your well has stopped working. There are many reasons why your well has stopped working, but in that moment, you need water!

At Perry’s Pump Repair, we offer 24/7 emergency repair to get your well back up and running whenever you need it. Our experts are skilled at finding the source of the system failure, offering a solution that works best for you, and repairing the system as needed.

If you need help repairing your well, give us a call!

Well Pump Failure Causes

If you’re wondering what happened to your well pump, there are a few factors that could have contributed to the failure. Homeowners can do a quick diagnosis to determine the root cause of a well pump problem, but we recommend you call a professional to address the problem.

Equipment Problems

Equipment problems are the most common cause of well pump failure. There are many working parts to a well pump system that could cause a pump to stop working, and the failure of one part can cause the entire system to fail.

The essential components of a modern drilled well system are: a submersible pump, a check valve (and additional valve every 100 feet), a pitless adaptor, a well cap, electrical wiring including a control box, pressure switch, and interior water delivery system. There are additional fittings and cut-off switches for system protection, but these are the basics.

Aquifer Depletion & Groundwater Problems

If you have running water first thing in the morning, lose it throughout the day intermittently, and then it returns when you come home from work, then it could be a sign of aquifer depletion. For the well pump system to work effectively, the recharge rate in the well would at least have to match that of the pump rate.

Water availability can vary from year to year, but generally, if your well is drilled deep enough, you shouldn’t have to deal with water loss. A typical well drilled in Florida needs to go at least 200 ft down to the bedrock of the aquifer. If the well was drilled only until it hit first water, then you’re less likely to have reliable water supply from the aquifer. At Perry’s Pump Repair, our wells are always drilled until it hits the bedrock of the aquifer.

Well Pump Wear & Tear

A submersible pump that is constructed in optimal conditions should last up to 15 years. However, depending on the construction of the well, a pump can fail much sooner than that. For example, wells constructed just PVC pipe versus steel casing with PVC have a higher chance of failure, especially in Florida. PVC pipe is prone to breaks and cracks, and the PVC pipe is not encased in steel, it can quickly degrade in the surrounding soil.

If the water in your area has high sediment content (sand, minerals, etc), it can cause the well pump to wear out more quickly. Any impact to the well, such as hitting it with a car or truck, or a chunk of gravel falling into the well, can cause your well pump to fail prematurely. We recommend regular preventative maintenance to ensure that these problems don’t catch you by surprise.

Diagnosing a Well Pump Failure

If you’d like to get a better idea of what’s happened to your system, we have a few steps for helping you diagnose the cause of your well pump system failure.

1) Check the Power

Check the power to the well and see if you have a short. If you well pump stopped working after a thunderstorm, check to see if the well was struck by lightning. If there is a short or surge in the power to your well, the circuit might have blown.  Turn the circuit breaker on and off again to test, or change the fuses.

2) Check the Tank Pressure

Find the pressure gauge on your pressure tank and read the pressure. If it is not showing a pressure of 30-50 psi or 40-60 psi, that indicates a problem with the electrical pressure switch.

If you are experiencing a water pressure problem, try manually closing the pressure control switch. Doing so should turn the pump on. Then, close the switch, and if the pump doesn’t turn on then the problem is with the pump itself.

Call Perry’s Pump Repair for Emergency Well Pump Repair

Whatever the cause of your well pump failure, you need an expert that can get your system up and running again as quickly as possible. That’s where Perry’s Pump Repair can help! Our trained professionals can quickly diagnose the root cause of a well pump emergency and offer a solution that works best for your budget and needs. We never try to sell anything you don’t need!

If you’re experiencing a well pump failure, give us a call!

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